The story of the Give It Back, George campaign as an infographic

The Give It Back, George campaign story as an infographic

Want to keep in touch with NCVO? Subscribe to one (or several!) of their newsletters here. You can also follow NCVO on Twitter: @NCVO

Want to keep in touch with CAF? Follow them on Twitter: @cafonline

 


NCVO: Victory for the Give It Back, George campaign

ncvo logoThe National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO) has today welcomed George Osborne’s announcement that the cap on tax relief on charitable donations will be dropped.

Sir Stuart Etherington, Chief Executive of the National Council for Voluntary Organisations, said: “We are delighted that the Chancellor has listened to reason and pledged to drop the charity tax. This is a victory for common sense and validates the strength of feeling from the thousands of organisations who lent their weight to the Give it Back, George campaign. This is a great day for philanthropy.”

“Huge thanks and well done to all the campaign supporters”.

Mandy Murphy 07714 243 942
Chloe Stables 07507 558 597

Spokespeople are available for reaction

The original post can be found on the NCVO website


CAF: Our response to Government u-turn on charity tax

CAF logoResponding to the Government’s announcement that they are exempting charitable donations from the cap on tax relief, John Low, Chief Executive of the Charities Aid Foundation, said:

“We are delighted that the Government has responded to the challenging calls from philanthropists and charities across the country and taken the bold decision to exempt charitable donations from the cap on tax relief.

“We realise the Government is responding to truly exceptional financial circumstances and is having to make tough decisions about public finances.  We acknowledge and welcome the Chancellor’s decision to do the right thing and exempt charity donations from the cap. We thank Ministers for the support they have shown to charities large and small, which are so vital to the health of our country.

“The Government’s ambition to strengthen the culture of giving, encourage philanthropy and build a Big Society is something we strongly support. We are enthusiastic about working with Ministers to encourage people to give time or money to support the causes we all care about.”

The original post can be found on the CAF website

 


Victory!

Today Chancellor George Osborne announced that he will drop the plans to limit tax relief on charitable giving. We will post our official response shortly.

Thank you to all our supporters -this wouldn’t have happened without you!

The Give It Back, George campaign team


CAF: Pasty tax and caravan tax: charity tax must be next to save “Big Society”

CAF logoCharities renewed their call for the Government to listen to the overwhelming demands to exempt charity donations from the planned cap on tax reliefs in the wake of u-turns over VAT on hot takeaway food and static caravans.

They called on Ministers to think again as a new poll showed that the overwhelming majority of the public believe charities cannot be expected to fill gaps in public services if Ministers cap tax relief on major donations which support their work.

The ComRes Survey, commissioned by the Charities Aid Foundation, also found people were worried that plans to cap tax relief on donations undermined the Government’s concept of a Big Society.

Charities have strongly backed the Government’s commitment to increasing giving and promoting voluntary work through the idea of a “Big Society”.

But the survey found that more than three quarters of people warn that the Government cannot expect charities to play a greater role in delivering public services while also trying to cap tax relief on big donations.

Nearly two thirds of people said that the proposed cap on charitable tax reliefs contradicts the Prime Minister’s vision of a Big Society. And nearly six out of 10 agree that Government cuts are undermining the idea of a Big Society.

Overall, a clear majority of people (61%) oppose the Government’s proposal to cap tax reliefs for charitable donations, including most Conservative (53%) and Liberal Democrat voters (64%).

More than 1,000 charities have backed the campaign against the tax relief cap, warning that it will hinder the ability of charities to carry out important work in areas such as social care, medical research and treatment, higher education and the arts.

The survey found:

  • More than three quarters (76%) of people agreed that the Government annot expect charities to play a greater role in service provision while at the same time introducing a cap on charitable tax relief.
  • Nearly two thirds of people (61%) agree that the proposed cap on charitable tax relief contradicts the Prime Minister’s vision of a Big Society·
  • More than seven out of ten (71%) agree that charities are being forced to fill the gaps in public services left by public sector cuts.
  • Three quarters (75%) agree that in the current economic climate, it is more important than ever that the Government supports charities.
  • Nearly six out of 10 (59%) agree that Government cuts are undermining the idea of a big society

John Low, Chief Executive of the Charities Aid Foundation, said:

“The Government has shown it is prepared to listen on issues like the pasty tax and the caravan tax. Now is the time for them to listen to charities, donors and their own supporters to do the right thing and exempt charitable donations from the damaging tax cap.

“The Prime Minister’s vision of a Big Society could be transformational, but risks being undermined by measures such as the cap on tax relief for charitable donations.

“We are fully behind that idea of encouraging people to give their time and money to good causes that benefit others, and want to support the Government in making their vision of social action a reality.

“This survey shows that the public are worried that the Government’s idea of a Big Society is undermined by measures such as the proposed cap on tax relief for donations to charity.

“We are sure that Ministers do not want to see the idea of a Big Society undermined at a time when charities are facing financial pressure and increasing demand for services. We want to work with the Prime Minister and the coalition Government to promote an even more generous giving society.

“It is important that Government gives charities the backing they need to make the vision of a Big Society a reality, which is why they must exempt charities from the cap on tax relief so charities can play the biggest possible part in keeping vital services running in these times of austerity.”

* ComRes surveyed 2044 GB adults online between 27 April and 29 April 2012. Data were weighted to be fully nationally representative. ComRes is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules. Full data tables are available at http://www.comres.co.uk/


NCVO: After caravan and pasty tax climbdowns, charity tax needs to follow suit

ncvo logoThis press statement appeared first on the NCVO website.

The National Council for Voluntary Organisations has responded to the Treasury’s plans to drop the controversial tax rises on pasties and caravans, saying that they need to do the same with the charity tax.

Sir Stuart Etherington, Chief Executive of the National Council for Voluntary Organisations, said:

“The concessions from the Chancellor show that he is willing to listen to reason following a period of genuine consultation. We hope he will apply the same logic to the much maligned ‘charity tax’.

“The cap on Gift Aid is already putting off donors.  It is affecting the vital work undertaken by charities both large and small, be that advancing medical research, supporting returning veterans or caring for the elderly.”

For more information contact Mandy Murphy in NCVOs press office on 07714 243 942 or email mandy.murphy(at)ncvo-vol.org.uk.

Notes to editors:

The National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO) http://www.ncvo-vol.org.uk is the umbrella body for the voluntary sector in England, with sister councils in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.  NCVO has over 8,300 members, ranging from large national bodies to community groups, volunteer centres, and development agencies working at a local level. With over 280,000 staff and over 13 million volunteers working for our members, we represent and support almost half the voluntary sector workforce.

Charities including the Charities Aid Foundation, the National Council for Voluntary Organisations and the Philanthropy Review are leading the Give it Back George campaign which calls on the Treasury to exempt charitable donations from the plan to cap personal tax reliefs: http://www.giveitbackgeorge.org.  The campaign now has over 1,000 organisations signed up.


Campaign update and three things you can do to make the campaign an even bigger success

Here is our latest supporter email. If you have any questions feel free to post them in the comment section of this post.

Dear Supporter

It’s been a while since we’ve been in touch, but the Give it Back, George campaign team has been working hard to achieve our aim of exempting gift aid from the cap on unrestricted tax reliefs.

The campaign is still getting some great media coverage almost two months since it started, and there have been some very positive meetings and other developments.  Two weeks ago, David Cameron gave ‘the most encouraging sign yet’ that the cap would be dropped, when he told the Daily Mail that the matter ‘would be dealt with’. We’re confident that we can win this, but we need your help to keep the campaign momentum going…

1. Tell us your stories

Has your organisation made an estimate of how much it might lose in donations if the cap comes in next year?  Have any of your major donors told you that they may have to rethink how much they give as a result of the proposals?  Are you raising money for a project or service for your beneficiaries which now may face an uncertain future if donations are heavily impacted?  Or maybe you have some nice examples (and ideally photos) of projects which might not have got off the ground if it hadn’t been for the generosity of major donors or money from trusts and foundations.

Whatever your story is we’d be really interested to hear from you if you have strong examples of how the cap might take its toll on your organisation’s work. Case studies will really help to give further weight to the campaign both in the media and in negotiations with key decision makers.  Please get in touch if you can help – all we need is a short summary of what your organisation does, what concerns you have and contact details.

2. Tell the press

Telling your local paper why you support Give it Back, George is a great way of spreading the word about the campaign, engaging communities and generating good publicity for your organisation.  You could write a letter to the paper or even just ring up the newsdesk for a chat.  Here’s a great example from the Eastern Daily Press. Contact details for local media are available for free at www.mediauk.com.

3. Tell a friend (this is quick and easy to do!)

The campaign now has an impressive roll call of over 3500 supporters, but we want to get the numbers up even more – together we’re stronger!

Please spread the word about Give it Back, George among your supporters, stakeholders and partner organisations, via newsletters and emails, your website or Twitter using the hashtag #giveitbackgeorge. To save you time, we’ve put together some pre-prepared copy that you can adapt or simply copy and paste.

Many thanks and best wishes,

The Give it Back George campaign team.


The Government’s decision to cap tax relief on charity donations will cost British society up to £1.5billion a year, according to new research

A study by Oxford Economics, the leading economic forecasting consultancy, analysed studies into the value of charitable work to show that a potential £500 million a year cut in charity incomes due to the cap would cost between £1.2 billion and £1.5 billion in lost benefits to society.

The study also found that falls in charity income due to the tax cap could also cost nearly 19,000 jobs in charities and the wider economy.

The research, commissioned by the Charities Aid Foundation on behalf of the Give It Back, George campaign, show the potential scale of the damage to charities and the causes they support from the Government’s decision to cap tax relief on major donations.

It came as Ministers met charity leaders on Tuesday at the “Giving Summit” hosted by the Cabinet Office and aimed at increasing charitable giving.

More than 1,000 charities are campaigning for charitable donations to be exempt from the Chancellor’s cap on tax relief of £50,000 or 25 per cent of income. There is anger and despair among many charities who fear the measure will cost millions of pounds.

Treasury Ministers have acknowledged that the charity tax cap will produce £50 million -£100 million a year in additional tax revenue. That is likely to equate to up to £500m a year in lost donations.

Figures calculated by the Charities Aid Foundation, which works with charities and donors to increase giving, show charities are already squeezed with an eight per cent real terms fall in voluntary donations since the start of the economic downturn in 2008.

John Low, Chief Executive of the Charities Aid Foundation, said:

“This research shows that the Government’s tax changes will cause real harm to the services charities provide. That means less medical research, less support for vulnerable people and less help for the causes we all care about.

“The reality is that this tax change will yield relatively small amounts for the Treasury, but threaten large cuts in charities, which are already hard-pressed in the current economic climate. Jobs will go, but more importantly, charities will be able to do less and the country will suffer both socially and economically.

“We have told Ministers directly that this change is already damaging charities and runs counter to the very idea of a Big Society. It is good that Ministers want to talk to charities and want to promote giving. But we need the Government heed the stark warnings in the Oxford Economics study and drop this damaging charity tax.

“We have said all along. It is not the rich who will lose from this tax change, it is vulnerable people and the causes we all care deeply about.”

 

Download the summary of the study (pdf).


PM’s comments on tax relief cap “most encouraging sign yet” that proposal will be dropped

ncvo logoThe National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO) has today welcomed David Cameron’s hint at a rethink on the tax relief cap on charitable donations, calling it the ‘most encouraging sign yet’ that the Government plans to drop the proposal.  Today’s Daily Mail reports that the Prime Minister said that the matter would ‘be dealt with’ when questioned about the widespread opposition to the plans.  He suggested that he wants the plans dramatically altered or abandoned altogether.

Sir Stuart Etherington, Chief Executive of NCVO, said: ‘This is the most encouraging sign yet that the diverse chorus of disapproval against the cap is being heeded by the highest levels of government.  We hope that the Prime Minister’s comments signal that this unloved policy is finally going to be put out of its misery.’

For more information contact Mandy Murphy in NCVO’s press office on 07714 243 942 or email mandy.murphy(at)ncvo-vol.org.uk.


Poll: Voters fear for future of charities as they condemn tax cap plans

Two out of three voters are worried about the future of charities in the current tough economic climate, according to a new poll which reveals deep disquiet about Government plans to cap tax relief on charity donations.

The ComRes poll of 2,044 voters across the UK, found six out of ten believe there should be no cap on tax relief for major donations, while three quarters believe Ministers should have thought more carefully before introducing the measure in the Budget.

Some 84% of people agree with the principle – promoted by the Conservatives before the last election – that we should not tax people on what they give to charity.

Most people (61%) also said that the tax cap contradicts the Government’s vision of a “Big Society”

The poll, commissioned by the Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) on behalf of the Give It Back, George campaign, which works with charities and donors to increase giving, comes as Ministers meet charity leaders at the Government’s Giving Summit (Today May 8), aimed at encouraging more people to donate time and money to charity.

The poll found:

  • 65% of people agreed that “given the current economic climate I am concerned about the future of the UK’s charities”.
  • 84% of people agreed that “Gift Aid works on the principle that we shouldn’t tax people on what they give to charity. I believe that this is a good principle”.
  • 61% of people agree that “there should be no cap on tax relief for charitable giving”.
  • 67% per cent of people agree that “I believe the proposed cap on charitable tax relief will have a negative impact on charitable giving”.
  • 61% agreed that the proposed cap on charitable tax reliefs “contradicts the Prime minister’s vision of a “Big Society”.
  • 76% of people agreed that the Government “should have considered the implications of the proposed cap on charitable tax reliefs more carefully before making the announcement”.

Charities are demanding the Government act now to exempt charities from the damaging and unfair tax cap to prevent it inflicting deep damage on the causes they support.

More than 1,000 charities have signed up to the campaign against plans to limit tax relief on major donations to £50,000 or 25% of annual earnings, amid rising fears that the measure will cost charities millions of pounds

John Low, Chief Executive of the Charities Aid Foundation, said:

“It is clear there is deep unease among the public at this unfair and damaging cap on tax relief for donations. People in this country are concerned that the economic situation will damage charities, whose vital work benefits everyone in society. This tax change will make a difficult time for charities even worse.

“The Government has promised to consult on this tax change. But we need Ministers to act now to end the confusion and exempt donations from this tax cap, which is damaging the work of charities now.

“Many major donors have simply stopped giving, frozen in their generosity by the uncertainty created. People who rely on the services of charities are being hurt today.

“Ministers have spoken out about the need to encourage people to give. That is enormously positive. But we need them to act to ensure these tax changes do not undermine their concept of the Big Society.

“We are not asking the Government to drop caps on all tax relief. We are only calling for charitable donations to be exempt.”

ComRes surveyed 2044 GB adults online between 27 April and 29 April 2012. Data were weighted to be fully nationally representative. ComRes is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules. Full data tables are available at www.comres.co.uk


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 41 other followers